Ten reasons to work with a head hunter

The most important aspect of growing a successful business is hiring great employees, yet where do you find amazing people? The hiring process can be lengthy and usually takes quite a bit of time and effort and, in the end, is not an exact science. There is always an element of risk in trusting to bring someone on board that you have not worked with before.

If you're having difficulty finding the right people or have an unusually high turnover rate, you might want to consider an Executive Search Consultant often referred to as a "Head Hunter" or Contingency Recruiter. These consultants spend all day reading resumes and interviewing candidates and spreading the word on great candidates that are available.

Here are ten reasons you might want to give one a call:

1. Guarantee

At least 95 percent of Search and Recruitment companies offer a candidate guarantee. This allows you time to decide whether you have made a mistake in the hire. The industry standard is 30 to 90 days money back or candidate replacement.

2. Contingency

Paying a service charge is contingent upon your hiring one of their candidates within 12 months of the submission of the candidate. This is your only obligation. Interviewing candidates is free!

3. Expertise

Typically, a good recruiter specializes in a certain discipline where as an internal HR generalist is often charged with being an "expert" in engineers, sales people, accountants, quality managers, etc… Working with an expert in a certain discipline saves time and helps you find the perfect fit since they know what to look for.

4. Saves time

A recruiter can help you save time and stream-line your hiring process. A good one will spend 30 to 45 minutes with you on the phone in the beginning in order to find out exactly what you want in a candidate. You would then set up a pre-determined time, possibly a week to three weeks later, to go over their three to four best candidates. While this occurs, you focus on what you do best and leave the searching, interviewing, pre-qualifying, preliminary interviews, reference checking, etc. to the Search Firm.

5. Focused Network

Those who do specialize spend all day growing a network of contacts. They will be able to access the "passive candidates"; those who are not listed on Monster.com and happily employed with your competitors just waiting to hear about new challenges.

6. Head Hunt

A recruiter has the freedom and expertise to call into your competitors and recruit from them whereas internal HR generalists or a company executive rarely feels comfortable in this role.

7. Outsourced HR function

The human resource department is often the most overworked and understaffed in an organization. Aside from hiring employees, they have the duties of handling benefits, payroll, sick time, orientation and a couple dozen other HR related functions. As a result, it is difficult for them to make filling the void on your staff a top priority. Hiring a great person takes a great deal of focus and coordination.

8. Confidentiality

Working with a recruiter allows corporate leadership to look outside the company without having to share this with anyone else within the company.

9. Reality check

Since the relationship is one where the recruiter does not work for the company, they are in a position to be blunt whereas an internal recruiter or HR generalist may feel intimidated. Maybe your pay scale is out of whack or the person doing the interviewing is too abrupt and scaring good candidates away. A good recruiter will tell you the truth about what you might be doing wrong.

10. Bringing them home

Good recruiters are adept at assisting you land the hard-to-get candidates. Candidates share information with recruiters that they definitely do not share with the hiring authority. This information can be crucial in helping a recruiter help them decide to take an offer.

Mario DeCarolis is owner of West Bay Group, Inc.; a search and recruitment company specializing in Accounting/Audit talent. www.MyAuditPro.com. TOLL FREE (877) 947-WEST.

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